Expedition to Angel Falls

Posted on December 10, 2012 · Posted in news online, Newspaper

Times-Standard, Eureka California – 10 December 2012.

Six Humboldt County residents participated this summer in an expedition to the world’s tallest waterfall, Angel Falls in Canaima National Park, Venezuela. Early in 2012 the Eureka, California based Jimmie Angel Historic Project (JAHP), a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit organization, announced its unique fundraising event, a “Tribute to Jimmie Angel Expedition” to Auyántepui and Angel Falls/Churún Vena in Canaima National Park, State of Bolívar, Venezuela. A portion of each participant’s registration fee was dedicated to the JAHP.

The core group of fifteen expedition members included co-leaders Paul Stanley of Angel-Eco tours based in Caracas, Venezuela and Karen Angel of the JAHP. The expedition also supported the economy of the indigenous Pemón who provided two canoes (called curiaras) crews, lodging, cooks and two expert guides Clemente Lambos and Arturo Berti.

The local participants were Steve Allen of Eureka, Steve Davidson of Bayside, Larry and Kitch Eitzen of Freshwater, Alan Mason of Eureka and Angel of Eureka.

Larry and Kitch Eitzen (Freshwater), Karen Angel (Eureka), Alan Mason (Eureka), Steve Allen (Eureka), Steve Davidson (Bayside) with the Churún River and Angel Falls in the background. Photo Credit: Paul Stanley, 3 July 2012

Larry and Kitch Eitzen (Freshwater), Karen Angel (Eureka), Alan Mason (Eureka), Steve Allen (Eureka), Steve Davidson (Bayside) with the Churún River and Angel Falls in the background.
Photo Credit: Paul Stanley, 3 July 2012

“I was thrilled with the number of people who registered for the expedition,” remarked Angel, “with participants from the states of California, Louisiana, Maryland, New York, Washington and two people from Auckland, New Zealand.”

After two days in Caracas, the capital city of Venezuela, the expedition members travelled by air to Canaima National Park where they spent a few days walking through savannahs and rainforests, swimming in beautiful box canyons with cascading waterfalls, and visiting with the indigenous Kamarata Valley Pemón in their villages.

Like many others on the trip, Mason was awestruck. “Flying over the tepui to Canaima National Park to get to our first lodge in Uruyén village was like nothing I’ve experienced before.”

Before departing on their canoe voyage to Angel Falls, the group was hosted by four of Angel’s Pemón cousins and their families with fruit, including home grown pineapples, and traditional corn cakes called arepas in the village of Kamarata. “Arepas, are the ultimate comfort food,” stated Larry Eitzen of Freshwater. Each guest was also presented with a fresh pineapple for their journey to Angel Falls. Pineapples are a native fruit in the region.

Karen Angel (center) with her cousins (l to r) Clementina Santos, Crescenciano and Nered Ugarte.Photo Credit: Paul Stanley, 1 July 2012

Karen Angel (center) with her cousins (l to r) Clementina Santos, Crescenciano and Nered Ugarte.
Photo Credit: Paul Stanley, 1 July 2012

Karen Angel, who is the niece of American aviator-explorer James “Jimmie” Crawford Angel (1899-1956) for whom Angel Falls is named, met her cousins’ father Jose Manuel (Angel) Ugarte on her first trip to Angel Falls in 1994. “He was adopted in 1939 when he was nine years old by Jimmie Angel and his wife Marie while they were living in Kamarata,” commented Angel. Angel visited in 2002, but she was too late to see Jose Manuel again who had died in 2001; however during the 2002 trip she did meet his two sons Nered and Santos Ugarte. “During the 2012 trip, it was very special for me to see Nered and Santos again, to meet their families and to meet cousins Clementina and Crescenciano and their families,” remarked Angel.

“Travelling to Angel Falls was not just a fascinating and wonderful trip through one of the most beautiful places I have ever traveled, it was filled with historical significance for me travelling with Karen Angel and getting to meet her incredibly kind Pemón relatives,” commented Steve Allen of Eureka.

Auyántepui, the largest tepui (tabletop mountain) in the region dominates the landscape. “Auyántepui is a beautiful, yet extremely rugged land,” added Steve Davidson of Bayside. Angel Falls was accessed by navigating the Akanán, Carrao and Churun Rivers from the south side of Auyántepui to the north side of the tepui in two curiaras with Pemón crews. The curiaras were large, 35 to 40 feet long, with powerful outboard motors. “The rivers change with each rainfall so it takes the skill of a Pemón pilot reading the water from the front of the curiara to give the hand signals to the motor operator at the back to slow down, speed up, or change course,” explained Angel.

“Angel falls is not easy to get to, no freeway or roads nearby. After a day and one half canoe trip, it had better be good. It wasn’t good, it was great,” exclaimed Eitzen.
Mason agreed saying, “One could also look at Salto Angel for hours at a time without getting tired. It was like being in an entirely different beautiful world the entire time we were there.”

After leaving Angel Falls by curiaras, the group’s Pemón crews navigated the Churún River to the Carrao River to arrive above Canaima Lagoon. The Carrao River forms into seven waterfalls that spill into Canaima Lagoon. One last adventure awaited the group, a walk behind Sapo Falls. “Walking behind a waterfall may not sound that scary, but when you have thousands of pounds of water cascading down on you to the point that you can’t see in front of you, it can become one of the most intense exhilarating experiences of your life,” exclaimed Mason.

The waterfall was named Angel Falls in 1939 by the Venezuelan government in honor of American pilot-explorer James “Jimmie” Crawford Angel (1899-1956) explorations of southeastern Venezuela. Angel first saw the waterfall 18 November 1933 while flying solo in the Churún Canyon, also known as Devil’s Canyon, in the heart of the vast tabletop mesa known as Auyántepui or House of the Devil. He remarked in his pilot’s log book, “Found myself a waterfall.” The world’s tallest waterfall is 3,212 feet tall, fifteen times higher than Niagara Falls.

Angel Falls ● Churún Vena ● Salto Angel is the world’s tallest waterfall at 3,212 feet (790 meters). Photo Credit: Karen Angel, 3 July 2012

Angel Falls ● Churún Vena ● Salto Angel is the world’s tallest waterfall at 3,212 feet (790 meters).
Photo Credit: Karen Angel, 3 July 2012

The Jimmie Angel Historical Project also uses the name Churún Vená which is the name used by the indigenous Pemón who live in the Kamarata Valley at the base of Auyántepui.

The next JAHP fundraising trip to Angel Falls is scheduled for the summer of 2014. See the JAHP website www.jimmieangel.org for information about the 2014 “Tribute to Jimmie Angel Expedition” to Auyántepui and Angel Falls/Churún Vena in Canaima National Park, State of Bolívar, Venezuela or contact Karen Angel kangel@humboldt1.com, (707) 476-8764, or Paul Stanley stanley@angel-ecotours.com.

The JAHP was incorporated in California in 1996. Its mission is to foster research and to provide accurate information about Jimmie Angel, his colleagues and their era of exploration with an emphasis on Venezuelan exploration during the 1920s – 1940s. The JAHP maintains an archive of photographs and documents for writers, filmmakers, journalists, museum curators, teachers and students. The JAHP has recently assisted with information and photographs for projects based in Canada, England, Japan, Latvia, Netherlands, and the USA.

Expedición al Salto Angel

Tiempo-Estándar, Eureka California – 10 Diciembre 2012.

Seis residentes del condado de Humboldt participaron este verano en una expedición a la cascada más alta del mundo, EL Salto Ángel en el Parque Nacional Canaima, Venezuela. A principios de 2012 el Eureka, Basado Jimmie Ángel Histórico Proyecto California (JAHP), unA 501 (c)(3) organización sin fines de lucro, anunció su evento de recaudación de fondos único, un “Homenaje a Jimmy Angel Expedición “para Auyantepuy y el Salto Angel / Churún Vena en el Parque Nacional Canaima, Estado de Bolívar, Venezuela. Una parte de la cuota de inscripción de cada participante se dedicó a la JAHP.

El grupo de quince miembros de dicha expedición incluyó líderes expertos en la materia como Paul Stanley de Angel-Eco con sede en Caracas, Venezuela y Karen Ángel de JAHP. La expedición también apoya la economía de los indígenas Pemón que proporcionó dos canoas (llamadas curiaras) equipos, alojamiento, cocina y dos guías expertos que llevan por nombres Clemente Lambos y Arturo Berti.

Los participantes locales fueron Steve Allen de Eureka, Steve Davidson de Bayside, Larry y Kitch Eitzen de Agua Dulce, Alan Mason de Eureka y Angel de Eureka.

Larry and Kitch Eitzen (Freshwater), Karen Angel (Eureka), Alan Mason (Eureka), Steve Allen (Eureka), Steve Davidson (Bayside) with the Churún River and Angel Falls in the background.  Photo Credit: Paul Stanley, 3 July 2012

Larry and Kitch Eitzen (Freshwater), Karen Angel (Eureka), Alan Mason (Eureka), Steve Allen (Eureka), Steve Davidson (Bayside) with the Churún River and Angel Falls in the background.
Photo Credit: Paul Stanley, 3 July 2012

“Me quedé encantado con el número de personas que se inscribieron para la expedición, comentó Ángel, “Con la participación de los estados California, Luisiana, Maryland, Nueva York, Washington y dos personas de Auckland, Nueva Zelanda “.

Después de dos días en Caracas, la capital de Venezuela, los expedicionarios viajaron en avión al Parque Nacional Canaima, donde pasaron unos días caminando a través de las sabanas y bosques tropicales, nadaron por hermosos cañones cerrados por cascadas, y visitaron a los indígenas Pemón del Valle de Kamarata.

Al igual que muchos otros en el viaje, Mason estaba asombrado. “Volando sobre el TepuyS del Parque Nacional Canaima para llegar a nuestro primer lodge en Uruyén, fue UNA EXPERIENCIA NUNCA ANTES VIVIDA”.

Antes de partir en su viaje en canoa al Salto Angel, el grupo fue recibido por cuatro primos Pemón de Angel y familiares con junto a arreglos hechos con frutos propios de la región, como por ejemplo piñas cosechadas localmente, también tuvieron la oportunidad de probar las famosas tortas de maíz tradicionales llamadas arepas en el pueblo de Kamarata. “Arepas, son el alimento principal de la comodidad,” dijo Larry Eitzen de Agua Dulce. Cada invitado se llevó consigo también con una piña fresca para su viaje al Salto Angel. La piña es una fruta nativa de la región.

Karen Angel (center) with her cousins (l to r) Clementina Santos, Crescenciano and Nered Ugarte. Photo Credit: Paul Stanley, 1 July 2012

Karen Angel (center) with her cousins (l to r) Clementina Santos, Crescenciano and Nered Ugarte.
Photo Credit: Paul Stanley, 1 July 2012

Karen Ángel, que es la sobrina del aviador y explorador Americano James “Jimmie” Crawford Angel (1899-1956) y que por quien el Salto Angel se le fue colocado ese nombre en honor a su descubrimiento. Dicho viaje lo realizó junto a José Manuel (Ángel) Ugarte en su primer viaje al Salto Ángel en 1994. Juan Manuel Ugarte fue adoptado en 1939 cuando tenía nueve años de edad por Jimmie Angel y su esposa Marie mientras vivían en Kamarata,”. Ángel visitó en 2002, pero era demasiado tarde para ver a José Manuel otra vez que había muerto en 2001; sin embargo, durante el 2002 viaje que cumplía con sus dos hijos Nered y Santos Ugarte. “Durante la 2012 viaje, fue muy especial para mí ver nuevamente Nered y Santos, para cumplir con sus familias y atender primos Clementina y Crescenciano y sus familias,” comentó Ángel.

“Viajar al Salto Angel no sólo es un viaje fascinante y maravilloso sino que, esta lleno de mucho significado histórico. Para mí viajar con Karen Ángel y llegar a conocer a sus parientes Pemones fue una experiencia increíble”, comentó Steve Allen de Eureka.

El Auyantepui, el mayor tepui (montaña de mesa) de la región domina el paisaje. “Auyantepui es una tierra hermosa, pero con tonos robustos”, añadió Steve Davidson de Bayside. Se le puede accesar al Salto Ángel navegando por el Akanan, Carrao y Churún ríos de la parte sur del Auyantepui. Se debe realizar en dos curiaras con los equipos necesarios y por supuesto con la ayuda de locales Pemón. La curiaras son grandes y cómodas, 35 a 40 pies de largo aproximadamente, y con potentes motores fuera de borda. “Los ríos cambian con cada lluvia por lo que la habilidad del piloto es vital, los Pemones son expertos en leer la corriente del agua desde la parte frontal de la curiara, de esta manera dar señales de mando al operador del motor que se encuentra en la parte posterior. Así se controla la velocidad, y los cambios de curso de la ruta”, explicó Ángel.

“No es fácil llegar al Salto Ángel, no hay autopistas ni carreteras”. Después de un día y medio de excursión en canoa, vale la pena, porque no es que sea bueno, sino genial”, exclamó Eitzen. Mason estuvo de acuerdo diciendo: “también se podría mirar el Salto Ángel por horas y horas sin cansarse. Era como ver un mundo hermosamente distinto todos los días.”

Después de salir de Salto Ángel en curiaras, la tripulación Pemón navegaron el río Churún y el río Carrao hasta llegar a la Laguna de Canaima. El río Carrao está conformado por siete cascadas que caen en la Laguna de Canaima. Una última aventura nos esperaba, un paseo detrás del Salto Sapo. “Caminar detrás de una cascada puede no sonar tan aterrador, pero cuando tienes miles de litros de agua cayendo sobre ti hasta el punto de no se puede ver que tienes delante, puede llegar a ser una de las más intensas experiencias más emocionantes de tu vida,” exclamó Mason.

La cascada fue llamada Salto Ángel en 1939 por el gobierno venezolano en honor del piloto y explorador estadounidense James “Jimmie” Crawford Ángel (1899-1956) el cual realizó exploraciones en el sureste de Venezuela. Angel vio por primera vez la cascada el 18 Noviembre de 1933 mientras volaba en solitario sobre el cañon Churún, también conocido como el Cañón del Diablo, en el corazón de la gran meseta conocida como Auyantepui o Casa del Diablo. El piloto comentó en su libro, “Encontramos una cascada.” La cascada más alta del mundo es de 3,212 pies de altura, quince veces más alta que las Cataratas del Niágara.

Angel Falls ● Churún Vena ● Salto Angel is the world’s tallest waterfall at 3,212 feet (790 meters).  Photo Credit: Karen Angel, 3 July 2012

Angel Falls ● Churún Vena ● Salto Angel is the world’s tallest waterfall at 3,212 feet (790 meters).
Photo Credit: Karen Angel, 3 July 2012

El Proyecto Histórico Jimmie Angel también usa el nombre de Churún Vená, nombre utilizado por los indígenas Pemón que viven en el Valle de Kamarata (base del Auyantepuy).

La junto JAHP viaje de recaudación de fondos para el Salto Ángel está prevista para el verano de 2014. Visite el sitio web JAHP www.jimmieangel.org para obtener información sobre la 2014 “Homenaje a Jimmie Ángel Expedición” para Auyantepuy y el Salto Angel / Churún Vena en el Parque Nacional Canaima, Estado de Bolívar, Venezuela o comuníquese con Karen Ángel kangel@humboldt1.com, (707) 476-8764, o Paul Stanley stanley@angel-ecotours.com.

El JAHP fue incorporada en California en 1996. Su misión es fomentar la investigación y para proporcionar información precisa sobre Jimmie Ángel, sus colegas y su era de exploración con un énfasis en la exploración de Venezuela durante los años 1920 – 1940. El JAHP mantiene un archivo de fotografías y documentos de los escritores, cineastas, periodistas, conservadores de museos, profesores y estudiantes. El JAHP ha asistido recientemente con información y fotografías de los proyectos con base en Canadá, Inglaterra, Japón, Letonia, Países Bajos, y los EE.UU..